Please forward this error screen to 158. Please forward this error screen to gtx 1060 ethereum mining rig. Please forward this error screen to 173. Please forward this error screen to 173.

It’s finally time for an update to my popular 2013 Litecoin mining guide! It’s four years later, and Ethereum mining is where it’s at for GPU miners, so that’s what I’ve focused on. I’ve kept the same format and detail level as my old guide, so if you were around back then, you’ll know what to expect. This guide will be broken into several parts, each focusing on a different aspect of building your first mining rig. First, let’s take a look at what you’ll need in terms of hardware to put a respectable Ethereum miner together. Build your own Ethereum Mining Rig, part 1:  Hardware Here is the list of hardware that I recommend. Don’t worry if you’re not able to get exactly what’s on this list, I provide some excellent alternatives below the table.

Motherboard Generally, any motherboard with PCIe slots on it is suitable for mining—typically one GPU per PCIe slot. The PCIe slots don’t need to be full-length, as we can attach GPUs to 1x slots with the help of risers. GPUs onto one motherboard, even if that board has enough PCIe slots to physically accommodate them. My top choice is currently the Asus B250 Mining Expert board. GPUs and 3 power supplies right out of the box. However, it currently costs about the same as Asus’s mining board, and for the money I’d rather stick with Asus.

Finally, the Biostar TB250-BTC is also aimed at miners, and costs considerably less than the Asus and ASRock offerings. 6 GPUs, but that’s likely all that the majority of us need. If you only want to use 3-4 GPUs in your rig, then you’ll have a much easier time. Most boards with up to four PCIe slots should accommodate a GPU in each. Keep in mind that you can use old hardware that you have sitting around—the board doesn’t have to be recent. Processor This one is easy: buy the cheapest CPU that works with whatever motherboard you pick.

When it comes to mining, the GPUs do all the work. Your CPU will essentially sit idle, so there is no reason to waste money on anything other than the bare minimum. All of the motherboards that I recommended based on Intel’s LGA 1151 socket, so that means the Celeron G3900 is probably the best choice. If you go with an AMD motherboard, a Sempron CPU will do nicely. Overkill really, at least for Linux.

If you want to run Windows, then 4GB is probably a realistic minimum. While Ethereum mining is pretty memory-intensive, everything happens on the GPUs. System memory will be pretty much unused, so there is no reason to spend money here, especially with DDR4 prices so high. Power Supply The power supply is extremely important—don’t skimp on it! A good, efficient PSU will keep your electricity costs to a minimum and more than pay for itself over the long run. Seasonic, EVGA, and Corsair are all generally top brand choices.

If you’re planning on running only 3-4 GPUs, you can save a bit of money and go for their 850 watt model instead. The RX 570 is usually significantly cheaper than the 580, so generally the 570 is the best choice. 580 card will do, the most important thing to look for is memory speed if you want the best performance. With all of that said, the 8GB versions of the cards tend to have faster-clocked memory than most of the 4GB cards, so if the price difference isn’t too large, spring for whatever is the fastest. If you have an old mechanical hard drive laying around, that’ll work fine too. The Case I highly recommend against trying to cram a bunch of GPUs into a conventional PC case.

You have two realistic options here: buy a purpose-built mining frame, or build something yourself. The first option is straightforward, if not a bit more expensive. Here is an example of an open-air frame that will accommodate up to 6 GPUs. If you’re handy, you can put together a simple aluminium frame yourself for a fraction of the cost of buying one. If you’re buying a mining frame, most include risers.

Risers can be powered or unpowered. A riser is unpowered if it simply connects a GPU to a motherboard PCIe slot. Unpowered risers allow GPUs to receive up to 75 watts of power through the motherboard’s PCIe bus, just as if they were plugged in directly. The newer USB-style powered risers often include SATA-to-molex power adapters. I do think the newer USB-style risers are the way to go—they’re longer and easier to work with than the old ribbon-style cables.